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US Development Programs; MLS vs USSF
Topic Started: Jun 21 2007, 12:35 AM (1,592 Views)
Dan Roudebush
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As a long time advocate of "Pros Should Develop Pros" I have been extremely aware of the new MLS youth squad development program.

The Red Bulls seem to be in the lead. Here's a description of what they are doing and the overall program in general.

http://tinyurl.com/2k47er


So what the heck is this new USSF Academy thing all about?

http://www.bigsoccer.com/forum/showthread.php?t=552775

How will this coordinate with MLS program? Isn't it just a USSF attempt to meddle in the Super Y League club domain?

Man you don't keep your ears to the ground and youth soccer politics in the US changes before you can get your ear trumpet out.
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shelsoccer
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Hackworth named an assistant to Bradley and to oversee the USSF Academy program; out as U-17 coach. Former Colombia World Cup veteran Wilmer Cabrera being mentioned as his successor with the U-17s.
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Yogi
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Are Nowak and Sorber remaaining as Bradley's assistants? By the way it is official Cabrera is the new US U-17 coach. An interesting choice, I don't know much about him other than he once played for Colombia. Anybody with more information about him?
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shelsoccer
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Nowak and Sorber remain. I suspect Hackworth's addition is less about bench and practice coaching as it is about player development and identification. Maybe a more active role with the Olympic team. We'll see.

Cabrera immigrated to the US four years ago. Had a stint with the Long Island Roughriders, got his A license, has been coaching for the historic Blauweis-Gotscheee club in NYC and has been on the fringes of some USSF programs, including some work with the U-18s.
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cafetero
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I'm happy for Wilmer Cabrera. He was always known as a heady player so I'll be curious to see how he'll do as a coach. It also will be good to see another way of looking at the game being brought in to coach a US youth team. He's definitely not one of the typical US Soccer coaches. Will be interesting too to see if he changes any way the methods for selecting and/or the types of players the US picks for it's youth national teams.
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Manzanares
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cafetero,Nov 12 2007
12:37 AM
I'm happy for Wilmer Cabrera. He was always known as a heady player so I'll be curious to see how he'll do as a coach. It also will be good to see another way of looking at the game being brought in to coach a US youth team. He's definitely not one of the typical US Soccer coaches. Will be interesting too to see if he changes any way the methods for selecting and/or the types of players the US picks for it's youth national teams.

I think it always is good to get a new set of eyes and a different perspective in charge of a country's national youth teams. Cabrera should provide that and it will be worthwhile following his progress.
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dafyd
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I'm cat sitting for some friends, and they have ESPNU, which is showing the USSF Development Academy Championships. While the games are not of a high caliber (what can you expect from a bunch of teens,) there is one thing that I must note.

One of the things I've complained about in the US Senior team is that too often when the ball is passed to them they stand there and wait for the ball to come to them. Not so with these youngsters. Even if the ball is passed directly to them, with out any opposition in near enough to present a challenge, they do a far better job of getting their feet moving before receiving the ball.

Now, if some of these kids can continue to develope, while keeping this habit, the future of US Soccer looks a little brighter in my eyes.
Leper In A Stange Land
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Yogi
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A question for the group here, now that MLS is eliminating it's reserve teams, what will happen with it's fledgling youth squads? I hope they do not go the same route as the reserve squads but with cost cutting ahead it would not surprise me.
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shelsoccer
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I haven't heard any change affecting MLS youth teams. They'll still be competing in various local/regional leagues, national tournaments (including one MLS runs itself) and the US Soccer Development Academy as far as I know.
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Dan Roudebush
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Nice article that details how players develop in Brazil

http://soccernet.espn.go.com/columns/story...england&cc=5901
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enganche
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That article is written by Sam Kelly who is registered here on this message board as Sam but has not posted in over a year. Maybe we can get him back here?

The ownership of players in South America is not always controlled by outside entities but that type of ownership is not uncommon. What is interesting about Traffic is that they've set up a club for the players they have under contract, kind of like a youth academy. Personally I dont see this as a sign of the future, clubs will still sign and develop their own players and this Traffic operated club will still be an exception.
Prefiero morir de pie que vivir arrodillado
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Martin
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I am going to revive this thread with a link to this article about Claudio Reyna being appointed to the newly created position of youth technical director.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2010/ap...do-here-soccer/

U.S. Soccer President Sunil Gulati introduced former national team star Claudio Reyna as the federation’s newly created youth technical director last week.

“Player development continues to be the core of what we do,” Gulati said in a media teleconference. “By its very nature it’s a long-term process, so it may not be as sexy as announcing a national team game or coach or winning a game, but it’s actually probably the most important thing we do.”

The federation separates player development into three zones, and Gulati has already addressed the top two tiers — the national team and, beneath that, adolescent players. Reyna’s immediate focus, then, will be on the third zone, or players between ages 6 and 12. The plan is to create a sort of national educational curriculum for coaches and players in that age group.

“We have to make everything better,” Reyna said. “I’m saying that because I don’t want it to be keyed on, ‘Oh, we just really have to get better at this.’ ”


The article focuses on how technical skills need to improve, note the quote from NASL veteran Brian Quinn about the reaction from Univ. of San Diego players to his technical skills.

Anyway, I am still not completely sure what role Reyna will have but I hope he is able to carve out an effective plan to help improve technical skills of US players, although as the article points out that will not be easy in the current culture of youth soccer where winning takes precedence over development.
Club Sportivo Desamparados
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shelsoccer
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I've been following this as well and would agree that Reyna's job seems rather amorphous. However, Gulati is a good strategic thinker who also usually has a grasp of the tactical methods necessary. I'm guessing he's painting a broad picture here to allow Reyna flexibility and also avoid any immediate firestorm within the contentious world of American youth soccer. It's increasingly evident to me that US Soccer and MLS intend to partner and monopolize development of elite players, leaving the alphabet soup of youth organizations to putter around with rec soccer (and that's OK) or wither away.
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Johnbuildr
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Having been heavily involved in youth soccer up to the state level for around 15 years a while back, I can only extend a sincere "Good Luck" to Claudio and the USSF in developing open lines of communicaiton or programs with or from elite level youth soccer.
Even within individual states, it is a many headed dragon/monster with far too many chiefs and not nearly enough technically sound indians developing our youth. Of course that could be an entire thread in itself.
So, it will be interesting to see if he can initiate any kind of recognizeable program that produces any kind of results over time.
Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum



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Yogi
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shelsoccer,Apr 15 2010
02:54 AM
It's increasingly evident to me that US Soccer and MLS intend to partner and monopolize development of elite players, leaving the alphabet soup of youth organizations to putter around with rec soccer (and that's OK) or wither away.

Like shelsoccer I too do not have a problem with that either. Indeed the thread starter focused on MLS youth academies too. Those are still in their infancy and the league still needs to work out how players produced in their academies will be allocated but it is a positive step and a way to get around the problem cited in the article Martin linked, that youth coaching is currently too focued on winning rather than developing players. Presumably a MLS club's youth program would be most focused on developing its players to one day be professionals rather than winning all of its games now with pure athleticism.
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