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Vintage Racing Videos; share interesting racing videos here
Topic Started: Oct 27 2016, 10:40 AM (661 Views)
wisdonm
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Thought it would be a good idea to share some old racing videos. This one is of the '57 Southern 500. Notice the three wide start. The lack of a pit wall and smoking in the pits. Driving in short sleeves. Wild times. maddr

'57 Southern 500


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IAracefan
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That's some pretty cool stuff. I can't believe those tiny guard rails on the corners, wouldn't stop much. :)))
Kevin
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Another Rick
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Quote:
 
I can't believe those tiny guard rails on the corners, wouldn't stop much. 22639478.gif
They didn't stop very much, many drivers went over the walls of those early tracks.

Thanks for the video. I think I now have a direction to take with my other '56 DelRay.
I build models because GOD allows me to and because I can't afford the real thing!!
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Lefturns75
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Thanks for putting that up Wizzo. I don't think I have seen that one before. Those guys then sure had some BIG stones to do that. I have driven some of those shoebox cars and NONE of them handle, turn or stop worth a darn. If you look at the arms on 'Ol Speedy there at the end, I figure he was equipped to handle the task. Like to see some of the little weasels driving today fight one of those cars for 500 miles.
Ordinarily I am insane, but I do have lucid moments where I am merely stupid.
I never TRY to hit another car. But when I do I make sure its a Prius.


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Throback
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Great stuff, thanx for sharing! I walked Darlington back in 1996 and the whole time I thought about all the cars that ran around the track that I was actually waliking on. I guess you could say it was almost humbling!
Frank Burval aka Frank the CRANK
Throback Scale Motorsports
Showdown Design and Graphics
Frank the Crank's Speed Shop

-Do your part to recycle plastic. Build models! (Me)
-Throback, its an old nickname...has nothing to do with fishing!!!
-Hey...Its Saturday night! If your not slingin' dirt you better be kickin' asphalt!!!! (Me)
-My Pappy Said, "Son you're gonna drive me to drinkin if you don't stop drivin that Hot....Rod....Lincoln! (Charles Ryan, W.S. Stevenson)
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wisdonm
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NASCAR Convertibles on dirt

maddr

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Stand on it....brakes only slow yoou down.
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wisdonm
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Southern Fryed Drag Racing ... Dallas 1970.

Sorry for the ads.

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Stand on it....brakes only slow yoou down.
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wisdonm
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Here’s NASCAR racing we just don’t see anymore: Tim Richmond’s spectacular come-from-behind victory at Pocono in 1986.

Always spectacular at Pocono with his loose, tail-out style, on lap 122 Richmond looped his Chevrolet trying to go three-wide through Turn 2, the treacherous tunnel turn, blowing out three tires and destroying the left-side sheet metal. Somehow a dozen cars managed to miss Richmond as he pinwheeled across the track, but the Monte Carlo fastback was still badly damaged. Richmond was only able to get the wreck back to the pits by driving in reverse, dragging the frame through the infield grass.

On pit road, Hyde and crew hammered the beat-up Chevy halfway straight again, and Richmond went back to work on the Pocono tri-oval. Somehow, soon he was picking off one, two, three cars per lap. With five laps remaining, he’d fought his way up to fifth, and on the final lap, he edged past Ricky Rudd and Hendrick teammate Geoff Bodine to win by a scant .05 seconds, the closest finish in Pocono history. Think this story sounds a bit corny and implausible, like a scene from Days of Thunder? See for yourself, courtesy of NASCAR’s historic Throwback series. Video below.

1986 Pocono Summer 500

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Chargincharlie6
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Absolutely great Wisdonm. Tim was indeed a natural talent in the sport if there ever was one. Course, ol Harry had so much up his sleeves sometimes he looked like Arnold Schwazenegger. B) Thanks for sharing this. Next we need to see Bill Elliott unlapping himself, pulling away from the pack, making up the whole lap under green, coming back though the field and winning at Talledega.

Dave B.
AMB RACING Oshkosh, Wi.
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Lefturns75
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Yes Sir, Wizzo. I enjoyed this much more than the "Bottom of the Pyle Kyle and Lipono" comedy I sat through the other day. You should post up one of these each week, it is more enjoyable to watch than segments of whining. Keep this going.
Ordinarily I am insane, but I do have lucid moments where I am merely stupid.
I never TRY to hit another car. But when I do I make sure its a Prius.


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IAracefan
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3 wide at the finish, how cool is that. fbr
Kevin
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wisdonm
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NASCAR in Detroit. 1951 Motor City 250
maddr

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wisdonm
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Not a video, but very interesting, NASCAR’S Lost Dirt Superspeedway.

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Nearly forgotten today, Memphis-Arkansas Speedway was one of NASCAR’s largest oval tracks in the 1950s. It was 1.5 miles in length, featured dramatic high banking, and the surface was dirt. Here’s the amazing story.

In 1954, NASCAR’s giant superspeedway in Daytona was no more than a gleam in Big Bill France’s eye. The grandest facility on the Grand National schedule was Darlington Raceway, the oddly shaped 1.366-mile oval in South Carolina, and the the bulk of the racing in those days was performed on bullrings of a half-mile or even smaller. However, there was one big oval on the tour, a high-banked 1.5-mile track located 20 miles west of Memphis—and amazingly, the surface was dirt.

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Opened on October 7, 1954, Memphis-Arkansas Speedway was the pride of three local owner-promoters: Clarence Camp, Nathaniel Epstein, and Harold Woolridge. The ambitious track layout, a full 1.5 miles in length, consisted of two 2500-ft. straights connected at each end by two sweeping turns of roughly 550 ft. radius. The track’s unusually high banking in the corners (exact angle unspecified, as far as we can learn) was formed by excavating the dirt behind the turns to form tall embankments, which created two small lakes, one outside each end of the oval. A large grandstand on the front stretch reportedly seated 15,000 spectators. They witnessed average lap speeds right at the 100 mph mark, far faster than any tracks on the tour except for Darlington and the Daytona beach course.

The debut event in ’54 was a 250-mile Grand National race won by the Oldsmobile of Buck Baker, who put five laps on Dick Rathmann’s Hudson in second. The field consisted of 52 cars, and Baker took home a princely $10,959 for his effort, the second-highest winner’s purse of the season. A pair of Grand National events were held in 1955, with Fonty Flock (Chrysler) and Speedy Thompson (Ford) each scoring a victory. The speedway hosted NASCAR Modified and Convertible Division races as well, and there were two more Grand National races in ’56 and ’57. The final Grand National event on the big dirt oval on July 14, 1957 was won by Marvin Panch, driving a new Pontiac owned by Herb Thomas.

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In its four short years of operation, the big, fast Arkansas speedway developed a reputation for being both scary and treacherous. In one bizarre crash, future Daytona 500 winner Tiny Lund was thrown from his ’55 Chevy (ironically sponsored by a seat-belt supplier) out onto the track, but he escaped with a badly broken arm. In 1956, two drivers were killed in a single weekend. In practice, Clint McHugh rolled his Oldsmobile in Turn 3, tore through a flimsy guardrail, and plunged down the steep embankment into the lake, suffering fatal injuries. Then on race day, Thomas “Cotton” Priddy lost a wheel in his Chevrolet, hooked a rut in the dirt surface, and flipped end-over-end multiple times, losing his life as well.

Promoters Camp, Woolridge, and Epstein had hoped all along to pave the track surface, but unfortunately, they never managed to secure the $100,000 required to perform the improvement. The track was closed before the start of the 1958 season and the land was sold to a local farmer for agricultural use, its role to this day. While the track, grandstands, and outbuildings are long gone, the outline of the oval is still clearly visible in satellite images, along with the two large ponds on the ends (above). The former race track is located near the present Interstate 40 about two miles west of little LeHi, Arkansas, and 20 miles west of downtown Memphis, Tennessee.

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Chargincharlie6
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Hmmm Wisdonm, looks like a potential SNRA marquee venue for next season!
You know, that $10,000 plus to win was a huge purse, one that I'll bet a lot of guys wouldn't sneeze at today, and wouldn't have even in the 70's. I seem to recall that when Don White won the September Milwaukee race in '69, my first real race, he took right around or just shy of $5000. Anyway, looks like it was a great place :))) !

Dave B.
AMB RACING Oshkosh, Wi.
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wisdonm
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The 1933 National Stock Car Road Race on the grueling road course in Elgin, Illinois. These races started i 1910. The 1933 race included two feature races on the 8.47-mile Elgin road course just west of Chicago: one for open class cars and a stock car race for production vehicles of less than 231 cubic inches.

The 1933 National Stock Car Road Race on the grueling road course in Elgin, Illinois.

Has a checkered past.

Stand on it....brakes only slow yoou down.
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wisdonm
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Watch foxy Junior Johnson stalk the field to score a clever victory in the 1960 Daytona 500.

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Here’s one of the great stories in stock car racing lore. Junior Johnson didn’t have the fastest or the most powerful car in the 1960 Daytona 500. No, he had a year-old ’59 Chevrolet under him, one that was prepared barely days earlier. And the Chevy was powered by a lowly 348 CID V8, outclassed by the muscular new 389 CID engines the Pontiacs were boasting that year.

Unfazed by the competitive disadvantage, the clever Johnson patiently stalked the field, using the aerodynamic draft to stay in contact with the Pontiac of Bobby Johns and the Plymouths of Lee and Richard Petty. With only nine laps remaining, the rear window on Johns’ Smokey Yunick-prepared Pontiac blew out, spinning him into the infield. Johns was able to continue, but by then Johnson was long gone, scoring the greatest victory of his young career.

Bonus At around the 2:30 mark in our little film, there’s generous coverage of a massive 37-car crash (the first Big One at Daytona, we could say). While the editing suggests this pileup was part of the 500-mile Grand National feature, in truth it took place in the Sportsman race that year. That bug aside, this film is an excellent six-minute snapshot of one of the great races in Daytona history.

1960 Daytona 500

Has a checkered past.

Stand on it....brakes only slow yoou down.
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