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CREEK SNEAKER IV; Bashing Garlits' Wynn's Jammer
Topic Started: Dec 21 2015, 11:53 AM (656 Views)
Duffy
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Okay, time for the next one. I opened up AMT's #6435 WYNN'S JAMMER kit and found mostly empty space inside...hmm, a very spare build here. Or, in another perspective, great potential for inventive thinking! Sure, that must be it. Yah. Here, I'll just take out this mucking great plank of a "display platform" (it masses more than the entire model-content stuff including the sprues)and put it on the raw stock rack, now what's left in here?

As I work up this model, I'll try to show some of the weird processes I come up with to do things that I'm not real good at without the weird. Let's start right in -

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This is a "Honeycomb Ceramic Soldering Board" - I suspect some genius rebranded a load of surplus furnace firescreens and made a fortune, but it's still our gain - and they go for like twelve bucks on Amazon. I'll post a link at the bottom here.

I got a couple of these during my slotcar-building days, and they are mighty handy for the kind of holding-down you see above. The holes fit 3/64" (.047") wire, which is small enough to bend without damaging your cheepest pliers, & so you make up a bunch of location pins & hold-down spring dogs and just keep 'em with the block for anything that might arise. The Logghe tube frame in this kit was a perfect app for this jig: I just bonded the three crossbars and let 'em set, then pulled the rear loops into position and held the lower loop in place on the board. You see a tall wire pressing against the upper loop there on the far side? That's holding the stubborn left half of the loop in place 'til it sets. The wire's got a Z-bend on the bottom, & I picked a likely hole and rotated the wire around like a crank 'til it put just the right amount of pressure on the loop.

I'm wondering now, how'd we ever do this kind of work as kids, with just that tube of goppy cement and our collection of clothespins & rubber bands? I dunno about you lot, but I was never this resourceful until I'd spent 45 years as a tool and die maker. I consider myself as living proof that it's never too late to have a happy childhood.

More later.

http://www.amazon.com/Honeycomb-Ceramic-So...soldering+board
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Bernard Kron
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Good to see you at it again. Gotta look into Honeycomb land for my next tubular chassis fab for sure!

The AMT Wynn's Jammer (also HemiSphere, and with a different body and exhausts the Hippie Hemi) is a very underated kit IMHO. Dragsters are by their nature pretty simple so there wouldn't be a whole lot of parts regardless. This kit has a true round tubing frame which require you to assemble it from halves because of limitations in the molding process. So it's fiddly and prone to warpage. But it's accurate and the running gear is some of the best detailed out there. And the front end is posable.

My only knock is that Garlits, in the early years of the Swamp Rat series, had his own easily identifiable take on a three point roll cage - very shallow angled. So when you use this frame as-is it always looks like a Garlits frame. For someone like me who doesn't build replicas, this can be somewhat limiting/annoying.

Looking forward to seeing more, more, more...
Keep on buildin'
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Duffy
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Ah, you mean that long, narrow top bar? Hmm. Well, too late now. If anybody asks, I'll say my guy was parked next to Garlits the weekend he got inspired to build up a frame, and sooo...

I'm thinking, right now at least, that I'll make up my own bodywork for this. I have reservations about painting the inside of a clear shell that's thick as this one, that the refraction of decals &c. will be obvious. Maybe, maybe not, but it gives me an excuse to thrash around a bit.
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Duffy
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Well, if you've hung around any of my builds, you've had to sit through my arguably-inventive, def'nally-self-serving roll call of fictional characters. Let's just get this bit out of the way right at the gitgo, shall we?

Owner/Driver: Erasmus Rejoinder (Muss) Tingle, PhD (spinal surgeon at Kaiser Hospital, Oakland CA)

Muss grew up in the Bay Area, and paid his way through college by playing guitar in a notable local band; it was in this group that he met his wife-to-be Jo, and they’ve been together since. Jo runs the books for the team and is a highly visible part of the team on tour, as well as frequently jumping onstage at post-race festivities and belting out some righteous R&B.

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In one of those perverse reversals of fortune that happen occasionally in fiction, Muss Tingle’s life took a hard corner on his return from The Sorbonne, where he’d completed his doctorate with groundbreaking research into radiating pain and numbness in upper and lower extremities (the famous “Paris Thesis” ): he caught the drag racing bug. Walked into Arnie’s place to compliment him on the flashy sign and instantly fell in love. He spent most of the Fall coming around whenever he could get time off from his practice, and quickly graduated from volunteer broom work to running the big Logan boring mill in The Colonel’s machine shop. Did it pretty good, too, and we eventually started treating him as one of the guys once we got past his habit of donning surgical gloves whenever he enters the shop.

Senior Wrenchman: Madden Flunder

Madden hails from west Texas, and spends most of his time there doing odd jobs and bartending (“which ain’t ‘odd’ at all, and don’t let me hear you say it”). He’s happiest where he can toss a quarter in the direction of any jukebox and punch up some Country, but when Muss hits the circuit he’s in the truck. He also can toss a football pretty darn good.

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CREEK SNEAKER

Muss lives in the Lagoon neighborhood of Alameda (a semi-posh enclave built during WWII for Navy brass: they took the dredgings got from making Oakland Creek into the Alameda Estuary to fill in the salt marsh on Bayside, and presto! A grid of luxury bungalows bordered by petite waterways. Nothing too good for our men in uniform, right?) and, when musing about a name for his race car, The Colonel Of Truth suggested “Creek Sneaker.” The name’s stuck.

More model-related content follows shortly...


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Duffy
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Now that the requisite nonsense is done with -

Here we are down in the nuts&bolts of the build. The AMT WYNN'S JAMMER is kinda "half a kit" in many ways, giving us quite a bit to build off of but not quite all the right bits out of that; and an interesting strange mix at that, certainly nothing to make me wanna ball the box up & shove it into the rainspout, but a few things here&there to make me wonder what they were thinking. We'll discuss some of these in the next few days.

For instance, the routing of the molded fuel lines is weird: the instructions tell us to connect both molded lines as supplied from fuel tank to fuel pump, making a closed loop. Did anybody question this? I decided to add a secondary pump to the inlet/outlet molded one, so now we got fuel in & up to the manifold as well as a return/pressure line back to the tank. I'm just cementing a teeny bit of tube to the side of the pump to replicate this, and it's here that I'll throw in my first Hint Of The Day:

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Sorry for the blurry pic, gang, but this will be mostly description anyhow.

Back in the '90s when I was making Renaissance flutes & other snobby instruments, I ran across an article in a woodturning magazine about how to bore deep holes in a straight line - basically it said that you can easily drill off-axis if you spin the drill, but that a stationary drillbit will track true down a rotating workpiece; and if it does start to drill eccentric, you'll know because the drill wil start to wobble in the holder. Well, like most of what The Old Good Guys know, this is true; and I made quite a few nice instruments by their example.

It works just as well in .060" rod, with a #72 drill! Here you see me boring an in-line hole smack down the center of my rod, by clamping the drill solid and twisting the rod in my fingers (I poked a dimple in the center of the rod with my scribe to begin the hole with). Try it, you'll love it.

Now, the other thing I'm doing tonight is the bicycle rims:

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If you've been following and why would you, you'll recall that I'm currently experiencing some major challenges with my darn hands. Now, I've got tooling all made up to do real nice wire rims, but I just couldn't face trying to do the work. I took a hard critical look at the stock rims in the kit, and sussed out that the main prollem with 'em is a nasty mismatch in the mold - the intended diameter of the wires-as-molded is about .020" (1/2" in scale), but the skew between the A & B plates of the mold increases that by at least half. I figured that a little trimming with a sharp #11 blade, shaving down the mismatch from both sides of each half, would yield me something more like the intent. You can see the result on the right side of this pic, as oposed to the stock molded part on the left. It's still big, but it's closer to acceptable this way, and it was an operation that my recalcitrant hands were capable of at this time. I also "undercut" with the smallest point of the blade in the larger, outer ports, to thin down the spokes as viewed from the side.

This makes for a much prettier wheel, and I figure I spent about ten minutes per half to get there.

Continued after Christmas -
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Duffy
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...And here're the finished fronts. A little better than stock but not all the way, to be sure. Gonna live with it this time.

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(I'm laughing - whenever I "accept" a compromise in my model projects, I'm always reminded of a comment a fashion-model friend once made to me" "Our careers start out so full of hope and dreams, and then begins the long slog to the point where it's just repeating the same single pose where nothing sags." It's true for us, isn't it? That's why we finish up with a series of what we call "Vanity Shots.")

The rims were given a dusting of gloss black acrylic followed by a light coat of Alclad Chrome.I didn't want 'em too shiny, I want the eye to slide over 'em and look away with just the impression of wire wheels. Done. The tyres, molded grey styrene in the kit, are semigloss black on the sides with a mix of flat black and gunmetal on the faces.
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Lefturns75
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Ah yes, them pesky spoke kit wheels. You did well, they look fine to me Duff. Makes me mighty happy the "L" Train runs Halibrand wheels. Much easier on my stiff fingers than what you just went through. The guys are thrashing on the car here. Its hard to tell whats taking place in the shop because "HP", thats what Leonard calls Heckpussy, has a Boston CD cranked up so loud half of Podunkville can hear Tommy's fingers sliding on the strings. Those two are starting to worry me a bit.
Ordinarily I am insane, but I do have lucid moments where I am merely stupid.
ANY problem race car can be cured with a pound of C 4, Detonator and a 12 volt battery.
Your drivers attitude will improve if you have the correct load in your Mossberg.
"After the last five or six Presidents, I'm Lookin' pretty good!"----
Richard Nixon
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krwasson
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:))) :))) rlr
Kevin
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