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English words in French?
Topic Started: Feb 25 2009, 02:12 AM (429 Views)
Pez201
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I've been reading a bit abou the English language, and I found out that in the Middle Ages in England, the language of nobility, royalty and of law (because the nobility and royalty WERE the law) was French, which is why English has so many words of French origin.

I was wondering how much of this has gone in the opposite direction? To what extent (if any) has English influenced the French language?
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disposablepuppetland
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Lots of modern English words get used for things that have only recently come about, like computers and the internet. They invent French equivalents but everyone still uses the English ones.
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Pez201
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I just remembered this thread. :P

Thanks for the answer. :thumbsup:
"I never said i was the first person..yesh. I admit Pez was the first one to throw a goat" - Fin
Leader of the Canadian Fat Whale Party from 21/5/08 - 29/8/09 and from 1/8/09 when his 48 hour brain fuzz cleared up. :D
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Niongor
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Large amounts of English in French is sometimes called "Franglais". :)
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the land
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or small amouts of French in English...


sort of like me righting a paragraph in a position paper in French instead of English... :shifty:


actually a more acurate example of Franglais would probably be Temp to make gateaux.
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Niongor
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the land,Apr 8 2009
11:02 PM
sort of like me righting a ...

Don't you mean writing? :eyebrow:
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the land
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yes...I am horrible at spelling...
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Niongor
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the land,Apr 11 2009
09:11 AM
yes...I am horrible at spelling...

I'm only bad with English spelling. One mistake I was always make is to spell "walk" as "work" :rolleyes:
"There is no next time: it's now or never!"

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the land
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I can't spell in either French or English...that's why they invented spell-check...but it's not perfect...
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Niongor
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the land,Apr 12 2009
05:35 AM
I can't spell in either French or English...that's why they invented spell-check...but it's not perfect...

Very true, spell checker once tried to 'correct' my mate's name from Carly to curly :P

Also, Afrikaans is much easier to spell with. Very phonetic language.
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the land
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Gaelic is probably one of the hardest languages to write, nothing is pronounced how it is spelled.
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Omnivorous
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I think it would be that nothing is pronounced as expected from the perspective of someone who speaks English ;)
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Niongor
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English pronunciation might be just as hard to a Gaelic speaker, I mean, think of that blasted "-ough" ending. :eyebrow: It's caught me out many a time.
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Phrenshqanada
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It's my understanding that the Normans (the Francophone nobility in England you're talking about) brought the words nord, est, sud and ouest into French from English.
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Niongor
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Phrenshqanada,Apr 17 2009
12:48 PM
It's my understanding that the Normans (the Francophone nobility in England you're talking about) brought the words nord, est, sud and ouest into French from English.

Hmm. Interesting.

The Normans took their name from being "north-men", and the Latin names for north, east, south and west be "septentrio, oriens, meridies, occidens" so you may well be right on that one Phrenshqanada. At least, that's my understanding of the Latin cardinal directions.

However, it would mean it also influenced the other Latin languages, as the Italian name for the directions is: "nord, est, sud, ovest".
"There is no next time: it's now or never!"

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Phrenshqanada
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Niongor,Apr 17 2009
09:50 AM
Hmm. Interesting.

The Normans took their name from being "north-men", and the Latin names for north, east, south and west be "septentrio, oriens, meridies, occidens" so you may well be right on that one Phrenshqanada. At least, that's my understanding of the Latin cardinal directions.

However, it would mean it also influenced the other Latin languages, as the Italian name for the directions is: "nord, est, sud, ovest".

And Spanish too, I gather (norte, sud). Makes one wonder why the Romance languages didn't inherit corrupted forms of the classical Latin terms (aűtre for south from 'auster', perhaps?) instead of adopting Germanic forms.
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Niongor
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Phrenshqanada,Apr 19 2009
01:55 AM
Niongor,Apr 17 2009
09:50 AM
Hmm.  Interesting.

The Normans took their name from being "north-men", and the Latin names for north, east, south and west be "septentrio, oriens, meridies, occidens" so you may well be right on that one Phrenshqanada.  At least, that's my understanding of the Latin cardinal directions.

However, it would mean it also influenced the other Latin languages, as the Italian name for the directions is: "nord, est, sud, ovest".

And Spanish too, I gather (norte, sud). Makes one wonder why the Romance languages didn't inherit corrupted forms of the classical Latin terms (aűtre for south from 'auster', perhaps?) instead of adopting Germanic forms.

East and west, in the Germanic languages, are derived from Latin variations of Greek words.

"East" is derived from Latin "aurora" which is derived from Greek "e˘s" meaning "dawn". "West" comes from Latin "vesper" which comes from Greek "hÚsperos" meaning "evening".

So, I think it's a case of Germanic languages adopting a Latin form, then the Romance languages adopting them back off the Germanic languages.

"North" and "south" are, however, pure Germanic terms that the Romance languages seem to have adopted.

Also, you mentioned "auster", in regards to French I know, but "austur" is the Icelandic word for "east" :rolleyes: :P
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Phrenshqanada
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Are you sure these are derived forms and not just cognates (Latin and the Germanic languages both belonging to the Indo-European family)?
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Niongor
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Phrenshqanada,Apr 21 2009
07:17 AM
Are you sure these are derived forms and not just cognates (Latin and the Germanic languages both belonging to the Indo-European family)?

Latin forms may well be cognates of the Greek forms, but the Germanis "east"/"west" forms are definitely derivitives and not cognates.
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