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Nothing wrong with ethnography
Topic Started: Dec 31 2016, 11:48 AM (263 Views)
Edwin Deady
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Along with the book on the second colloguium on the Dover Bronze Age Boat, Bronze Age Connections, and Preserved in Peat, covering the remarkably preserved BA burial in Devon, I got for Christmas The Saltwater Frontier, Indians and the Contest for the American Coast. Apart from my interest in North American watercraft and activities this book should be a salutary reminder as to how busy the coast of a pre-industrial area can be and probably was in the Bronze Age.

It is so easy to visualise an empty beach or estuary with a lone coracle in the mist. This is reinforced of course by the scarcity of finds. Or at least it was but see the numbers of log boats found at Must Farm or the three potential skin boats from Dalgety, Scotland and the number of possible sewn boat bits around from the Humber to Wales.

It is now reasonable to picture numerous pairs of coracles working the waters of rivers and estuaries, fishing and ferrying, well-used landing points for longer distance skin, dugout and sewn planked boats along with a population used to and exploiting the sea ans rivers. One of my other presents, Bronze Age Connections, reinforces this idea with evidence of cross-channel trade and relationships.

But was it all peaceful? The golden view of a Mother worshipping Bronze Age? Probably not, we have evidence of violence on land and maybe the sea was no exception. Raiders lurking around headlands, dues being demanded by tribes ashore etc. All maybe part of a bustling aquatic life.

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Sean Manning
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There are some pretty impressive stories of pioneers in BC seeing fleets of dozens of canoes fishing or travelling or fighting each other from their farms on the shore.
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Edwin Deady
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Sean Manning,Jan 6 2017
05:37 AM
There are some pretty impressive stories of pioneers in BC seeing fleets of dozens of canoes fishing or travelling or fighting each other from their farms on the shore.

Absolutely, have been following the progress of the canoe journey and arrivals rituals revival and the history of their boats and activities. have you seen this boat builder who is producing reconstructions in affordable plywood, correctly weighted?http://www.applegateboatworks.com/coastal.html
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Matthew Amt
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Edwin Deady,Jan 6 2017
05:03 AM
Sean Manning,Jan 6 2017
05:37 AM
There are some pretty impressive stories of pioneers in BC seeing fleets of dozens of canoes fishing or travelling or fighting each other from their farms on the shore.

Absolutely, have been following the progress of the canoe journey and arrivals rituals revival and the history of their boats and activities. have you seen this boat builder who is producing reconstructions in affordable plywood, correctly weighted?http://www.applegateboatworks.com/coastal.html

Oh, very clever! Dugouts without the digging! Thanks for the link.

Matthew
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Edwin Deady
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I have been trying to avoid a quick and dirty Roos Carr boat in plywood these many years.
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JamesBoschma
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Edwin Deady,Dec 31 2016
11:48 AM
But was it all peaceful? The golden view of a Mother worshipping Bronze Age? Probably not, we have evidence of violence on land and maybe the sea was no exception. Raiders lurking around headlands, dues being demanded by tribes ashore etc. All maybe part of a bustling aquatic life.


Take a resource which people have any need to compete for and someone is going to hit on the idea of hitting some other fellow over the head to get it. Given the popularity of that idea among chimpanzees, it suggests this was the way the world worked way before anything looking like an Anatomically Modern Human could string a sentence together, much less cast bronze. Why human nature would have gone on hiatus in Old Europe before the mean, nasty Indo Europeans showed up is conceptually silly even before one starts selectively ignoring or misinterpreting archaeological evidence to shore up the hippy-dippy silliness.
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