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Reconstruction of Table from Gordium; As presented in 2011
Topic Started: Dec 20 2016, 03:56 PM (179 Views)
Gregory J. Liebau
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http://www.conservators-converse.org/2013/...by-rick-parker/

I've been looking at ancient furniture and came across this nifty little article describing the replication of a unique table discovered in the ruins of ancient Gordium, which was the capital of the early Iron Age Kingdom of Phrygia. Thought it was worth admiring.

Below is an article from Wikipedia presenting an overview of the wooden artifacts discovered at Gordion sites and their levels of preservation, including some information about how they have been researched and maintained, which relates nicely to the piece on the reconstructed table.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordion_Furni...ooden_Artifacts

Cheers!

-Gregory
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Matthew Amt
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Oh, neat, thanks for posting that!

I had the good fortune to visit the Gordion exhibit at the University of Pennsylvania Museum a couple months ago, and it was fascinating. Amazing amount of stuff, so well preserved. The show ended in November, but the University has an ongoing project at Gordion.
https://www.penn.museum/research/projects-r...logical-project

Matthew

PS: I *don't* think I'll be adding that particular table to my project list, lovely as it may be!
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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I always find these things fascinating, as they completely upset people's views of prehistory. No unga bunga big logs as table, but furniture that surpasses even the most complex recent examples in outlandishly complex design and craftmanship.
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Gregory J. Liebau
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Matt, it looks like a great project that the university is a part of, and I'm sure you must have seen a lot of cool stuff in the exhibit! Were there any pieces in particular that struck you?

Indeed, Jeroen. I think it's easy to forget that the best of the ancient craftsmen had minds that worked similarly to the masters of any age, and their potential ingenuity can be compared to folks designing jet engines and cell phone microchips today. Being limited in their resources and concepts only by the slow march of progress, why should we not expect them to have created extravagant and beautiful things?

-Gregory
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Matthew Amt
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Oh, gosh, lemme think. For starters, I was out of my "comfort zone" cuz I don't know diddly about Phrygia! But knowing it was 8th century gave me at least a temporal handle.

I was definitely struck first by the mound itself. It's bloody HUGE, competing well with the pyramids, Eiffel Tower, etc. (There were sillhouettes to compare!) And the burial chamber itself was INTACT, gorgeous cedar timbers that didn't even look that old.

LOTS of brooches! And all of a couple very distinctive styles, not much different from Greek or Roman ones in basic function but of a very complex construction that I simply could not fathom. Box-shaped sections on the body with spherical knobs, just massive and looking like machine parts of some sort. Most of them were silver, as I recall.

Not a SCRAP of gold in the whole burial. Plenty of silver, and a ton of bronze cookware and eating ware, including a couple huge cauldrons, but no gold. Very un-Midas-like!

Have to dig out the exhibition flyer.

Matthew
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Todd Feinman
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That is incredibly cool! Thanks. Love the apatropaic designs on the woodwork. Really takes one back.
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