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Sword hilt question
Topic Started: Jan 27 2016, 07:47 AM (395 Views)
Harry Marinakis
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I've been looking at the large gold-gilded rivets on sword hilts, and wondering how they got the large slightly-domed rivet heads on both sides.

You could cast one head, push the rivet through the grip/tang and then?.....

Peen the other side? You would have to leave a long shank in order to end up peening a large domed head. But if you leave a long exposed shank then all you do is bend it not peen it.

So how do you think they did these rivets?


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Todd Feinman
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Harry Marinakis,Jan 27 2016
07:47 AM
I've been looking at the large gold-gilded rivets on sword hilts, and wondering how they got the large slightly-domed rivet heads on both sides.

You could cast one head, push the rivet through the grip/tang and then?.....

Peen the other side? You would have to leave a long shank in order to end up peening a large domed head. But if you leave a long exposed shank then all you do is bend it not peen it.

So how do you think they did these rivets?

If gold, could you cast one of the domed heads and leave enough of the rivet material through the hole to bend it into a flat spiral and then use a U-shaped metal plate to guard the hilt while you permed the done with a form? Or fused the dome to the spiral and then beat the dome? Dunno, just a thought.
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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They used washers. You can see that on the lower example, where the rivet is not covered in gold. I don't know if they used them on both sides, or just used a cast domed rivet with a washer on the other.
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Harry Marinakis
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JEROEN YOU ARE MY HERO!
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Jeroen Zuiderwijk
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Harry Marinakis,Jan 28 2016
02:53 AM
JEROEN YOU ARE MY HERO!

You're welcome :) As for the gold on the rivet heads, I guess they used the same overlay or damascening https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascening) technique as for the decoration on the blades. I must add though that I've not seen the direct evidence yet for the method by which the gold was attached. For damascening, fine cross hatched grooves are normally applied, which are used as anchoring when the gold/silver is hammered onto the surface. If anyone knows of examples of such blades that show that pattern, it would be most welcome.
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