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Knossos es muy grande!
Topic Started: Jan 12 2016, 08:34 PM (296 Views)
Todd Feinman
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http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/a...0957759/?no-ist
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Callum
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I thought it was established that the Cretan elite were merchants.
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Todd Feinman
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Callum,Jan 12 2016
11:02 PM
I thought it was established that the Cretan elite were merchants.

Yeah, Edwin, that's what I thought too! Maybe they were just surprised by the quantity of foreign items that are now turning up --or something. Glad to hear it is much larger than anticipated; more chances for important discoveries, like more Linear A or B tablets.
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Matthew Amt
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I'm always surprised that archeologists are surprised to find stuff in places they haven't looked before! And then to find that a huge bustling city was also a *trade center*, well, golly! (Sorry, it's too early...)

The elite are ALWAYS the people with the weapons. Know what happens when the guys with the swords and armor find out that there is a whole social class with more money and power than them but no weapons?

Matthew
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Gregory J. Liebau
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Walking around the site of Troy made me appreciate this factor regarding the ancient palace cities. We've had imagery such as Connolly's beautiful paintings that have focused on the palatial structures and largely ignored/were ignorant of the rest of the city around, which certainly comprised a majority of the inhabited space. Troy has wells and evidence of dense housing hundreds of meters from the famous palace, but virtually none of it's been excavated yet due to all of the fun factors involved in government and academics working together... These places must have been quite awe-inspiring to see in their heydays!

-Gregory

(EDIT: Now that I think of it, I feel like I explained this before... This particular topic didn't come up before, did it?)
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