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Incredible Exhibit!
Topic Started: Jan 24 2015, 08:52 PM (309 Views)
S. Workman
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I just drove to Montreal to see this:
http://www.pacmusee.qc.ca/en/exhibitions/t...ander-the-great
About half the whole exhibit was Minoan and Mycenaean bronze age stuff, and was it ever cool. They had 5 shaft grave swords type A and B, daggers, spears, a very long type C sword from Kydonia, a G sword from Spathes, and the whole kit from the Kallithea tomb except (sadly) the greaves. That last had a huge and beautiful Naue sword. There were several tomb ensembles from the Iron Age including a warrior priest with many spears and an entire cremation burial with all ceramics, weapons, and the original completely preserved cinerary core with the human bones. I only had to go an hour and a half to see it, I would have gone much farther. I will probably go back in a month just to see it again, the swords were just off the hook.
The catalog was big, well illustrated, and expensive, but I bought it. Photos were sadly forbidden.
Oh yeah, there were many Macedonian and Boeotian arms and helmets.
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S. Workman
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An interesting aside, I just read the catalog entry on the cremation burial. It had been a quadrangle of logs, with the fire in the center. After the cremation, the whole thing was buried. The warrior was buried with a very lovely iron Naue sword and two iron knives, as well as a whole assembly of cups and other gear, mostly fire damaged. The bones shown in the exhibit are actually those of a man decapitated and lain within the quadrangle but not in the fire. He was just sort of scorched. This grave was found in Crete, but does remind one of the pyre of Patroclus insofar as the gear and sacrifice. I don't know how I failed to notice this when I was there, I must have been overwhelmed.
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