Welcome Guest [Log In] [Register]
Welcome to Bronze Age Center. We hope you enjoy your visit.


You're currently viewing our forum as a guest. This means you are limited to certain areas of the board and there are some features you can't use. If you join our community, you'll be able to access member-only sections, and use many member-only features such as customizing your profile, sending personal messages, and voting in polls. Registration is simple, fast, and completely free.


Join our community!


If you're already a member please log in to your account to access all of our features:

Username:   Password:
Add Reply
Earliest shield
Topic Started: Feb 8 2011, 04:26 AM (531 Views)
Dan Howard
Member Avatar
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
I was wondering what the earliest shield find is. A shield mould found at Kilmahamogue in Ireland was radiocarbon dated to the first half of the second millenium. There is a surviving Mari shield made of reeds and covered with hide. What is the earliest shield boss so far found?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Yves Goris
Member
[ * ]
i don't know the earliest shield but i'm interested in knowing more about that mari shield. do you have more info on this?
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Todd Feinman
Member Avatar
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
Hi Dan,
I'm also interested in the Mari shield! Have you seen the "police" shield on this page:
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/policemuseum.htm
It looks pretty old, and the construction is very interesting.

Todd
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Dan Howard
Member Avatar
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
I don't have any info on the Egyptian police shield, but at first glance it looks like it dates to the Roman period.

The Mari sheild is briefly mentioned in Hamblin's book. On page 57 he is talking about Lagash shields and uses a surviving Mari shield to speculate on how the Lagash ones may have been constructed. All he says is that it was made of reeds and covered with hide.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Todd Feinman
Member Avatar
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
Dan Howard,Feb 9 2011
09:11 PM
I don't have any info on the Egyptian police shield, but at first glance it looks like it dates to the Roman period.

The Mari sheild is briefly mentioned in Hamblin's book. On page 57 he is talking about Lagash shields and uses a surviving Mari shield to speculate on how the Lagash ones may have been constructed. All he says is that it was made of reeds and covered with hide.

Yeah, I was thinking Roman Period too --it looks a lot like a scutum.
Too bad about the Mari shield details! I wonder where the remains are? I'm sure there are "top men" working on it ;-)

Todd
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Dan Howard
Member Avatar
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
Dan Howard,Feb 9 2011
09:11 PM
The Mari sheild is briefly mentioned in Hamblin's book. On page 57 he is talking about Lagash shields and uses a surviving Mari shield to speculate on how the Lagash ones may have been constructed. All he says is that it was made of reeds and covered with hide.

Have a reference for that Mari Shield. Haven't read it yet.

Joan Aruz (ed.), The Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium BC from the Mediterranean to the Indus (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003), 99.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Matthew Amt
Patron
[ *  *  * ]
Quote:
 
Have you seen the "police" shield on this page:
http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/policemuseum.htm


That's the Fayum shield, dated to the first century BC. It is generally believed to be either Roman or at least Roman-influenced. It's 3 layers of wood strips (birch? I forget) covered with felt.

Matthew
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
Yves Goris
Member
[ * ]
Dan Howard,Feb 15 2011
05:41 AM
Dan Howard,Feb 9 2011
09:11 PM
The Mari sheild is briefly mentioned in Hamblin's book. On page 57 he is talking about Lagash shields and uses a surviving Mari shield to speculate on how the Lagash ones may have been constructed. All he says is that it was made of reeds and covered with hide.

Have a reference for that Mari Shield. Haven't read it yet.

Joan Aruz (ed.), The Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium BC from the Mediterranean to the Indus (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003), 99.

thanks i'll order.
Offline Profile Quote Post Goto Top
 
« Previous Topic · Near Eastern Studies · Next Topic »
Add Reply