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Rameses armour
Topic Started: Dec 6 2010, 10:22 PM (804 Views)
Dan Howard
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I recall an Egyptian source saying that Rameses could put his armour on unassisted. I'm after a cite for this source. This passage has implications for how the armour was constructed for it implies that it was fastened at the front or sides rather than at the back.
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Todd Feinman
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Dan Howard,Dec 6 2010
10:22 PM
I recall an Egyptian source saying that Rameses could put his armour on unassisted. I'm after a cite for this source. This passage has implications for how the armour was constructed for it implies that it was fastened at the front or sides rather than at the back.

Hi Dan, is it:

He seized his weapons of war; he girded his coat of mail (sic); he was like Baal in his hour.

--The Poem of Pentaur


Here's the poem:
http://www.reshafim.org.il/ad/egypt/kadeshaccounts.htm


Todd
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Dan Howard
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That's it. Thanks Todd.
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Yves Goris
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could it be possible that this is propaganda?

could you interpret it as "he was so great that he could put on his armour himself (where other people needed an assistent)" ?
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Dan Howard
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That's certainly possible. It also could just be a simplification. The phrase "he girt his armour" could be shorthand for "he had his armour put on by his attendants"
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Gregory J. Liebau
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Considering the poetic license of such a phrase, I'd go with Dan's latest interpretation... It wouldn't sound as elegant at all to say that "his servants then put on his armor."

-Gregory
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Brock H
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I have to agree that it's most likely a poetic shorthand used rather than describing how his attendants dressed him in his armor. It also keeps the emphasis firmly on pharoah, who does not need mere mortals to aid him.
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